Influencer/YouTuber Mika Stauffer and her Husband Dissolve Adoption of their Disabled Son: A Disabled Adoptee’s Perspective

Content warnings for discussion of adoption, racism and child abuse

Image description: A white couple Myka and James Stauffer sit on a white bed while both wearing white shirts. Myka has dyed blonde hair and is wearing glasses, James has a beard and is bald
Image description: A white couple Myka and James Stauffer sit on a white bed while both wearing white shirts. Myka has dyed blonde hair and is wearing glasses, James has a beard and is bald

Mika Stauffer is a YouTuber and Instagram influencer. She has hundreds of thousands of followers and she has just revealed that she and her husband James have dissolved the adoption of their autistic son Huxley who they adopted from China.

This is a story that is steeped in racism that I am not best placed to talk about/ If you read this please also seek out commentary from transracial and transnational adoptees. They can best contextualize the impacts of the racism involved in this tragedy.

Transracial is an accepted term in the adoption community reffering to adopted children whose parents do not share the child’s race.

Huxley Stauffer is a transracial adoptee.

I myself am a disabled adoptee and I have experience with being the child that my parents did not expect and the consequences that I experienced as a result of that.

I tweeted about it yesterday.

While I was never “rehomed” (a term more appropriate when speaking about pets not children), my parents very much resented my disabilities.

My parents decided early on that they would not allow themselves to be inconvenienced by my cerebral palsy. So they decided that I just needed to grow out of it.

As growing out of brain damage was not a thing I could accomplish, I was punished for not living up to their expectations. Often if I needed help with something, I just had to accept that it wasn’t going to get done or I couldn’t have it. I could also expect to be lectured on how the situation was entirely my fault for not trying hard enough.

The abuse and neglect surrounding my physical limitations came primarily from my mother, though she taught the rest of the family to have the same unreasonable expectations of me. My father put me through daily psychological hell because I was undiagnosed autistic and I hated his form of “humour” which largely comprised getting into my space while miming violence and refusing to stop calling me hated knicknames or retelling heavily embellished stories twisted to humiliate me.

He drove me to tears on a nearly daily basis. This behaviour was also normalized in the family and it was always my fault for being upset by it.

One of the things he frequently brought up was a story he had heard second hand from a coworker. I had been going door to door selling Girl Guide cookies and knew that I was approaching the home of someone I knew. Rather understandably I chose to exploit this connection in order to sell cookies. I told him that I knew who he was and that he worked with my dad and that he should buy cookies. He bought cookies.

When he relayed this story to my dad at work, I’m certain he was just sharing a cute story involving his co-workers kid. He definitely didn’t know that I would be harassed with this story for years after.

My dad came home and gleefully retold this story in a sing songy voice, implying that I had behaved ridiculously. I burst into tears. Thus established as something that was guaranteed to get under my skin, my dad would chant “I know you and you know my dad” at me insistently as though this was the most ridiculous thing a 6 year selling cookies could ever do.

It was so ingrained as a hilarious and timeless story that even after my dad died my family kept doing it. One day we had that coworker to dinner and my mother dropped a sing song “I know you and you know my dad” into the conversation thinking this man was in on the joke. He stared atr her blankly until she awkwardly changed the subject.

To him it was just a long forgotten anecdote about a friend’s cute kid. However, for me it became something that resulted in decades of harassment.

I used to beg dad to stop harassing me. I tried talking to him about it like an adult but he was too convinced that I was the problem, I had to just get over it and learn to laugh.

Unsurprisingly years of psychological abuse eventually turned physically violent and at that point dad also threatened “I can send you back where you came from”.

It is important here to make clear that throughout my childhood I was constantly told everything was my fault. If I couldn’t figure out how to do something, I was lazy and not trying hard enough. If I complained about the ever present harassment that I experienced, I was told it was my own fault and if I stopped reacting to it, it would stop.

So being told that by a parent even an abusive one that I was still “other” and potentially disposable was devastating even as I was the victim of a physical assault.

One of the things that I find interesting (read: concerning) about the Mika Stauffer debacle aside from the fact that this child was used for views and financial gain before being effectively thrown away (which has been written about thoroughly elsewhere) is that there seems to be little focus on the role of James Stauffer, Myka’s husband.

Much of the ire is being directed at her while her husband is not being targeted with the same degree of censure.

So I just want to remind everyone that James Stauffer abandoned this child too. He would have been involved in the decisions.

The hell I lived through is not an isolated incident. It is the experience of far to many disabled children whether they are adopted or not. We need to hold the parents of disabled children to a higher standard based on outcomes for the child and not simply assume that “they are doing the best that they can”

How to Support Me and My Work

The outbreak of COVID-19 has created a lot of financial precarity for me, so I would really appreciate any assistance you are able to offer

Please if you are able help the most vulnerable in your communities by practicing social distancing responsibly and by not hoarding resources.

I personally am experiencing financial difficulties as a result of Covid-19 and would appreciate any assistance you can offer, even if it’s just to share this blog post.

If you are able please consider helping me financially during this time. My situation is quite precarious.

You can support me on Patreon

Become a Patron!

You can buy me a coffee

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Or send me money directly through Paypal

paypal.me/crippledscholar

Cripping Quarantine: Corona Virus, Disability, and Mental Health

Content Warning for mentions of mental health and abuse

Image Description: The words "STAY HOME" written seven times in shades of green, purple, red, and yellow on a pale mint background
Image Description: The words “STAY HOME” written seven times in shades of green, purple, red, and yellow on a pale mint background

I have been in self isolation since March 16, I have only gone out twice since then and those trips were unavoidable to collect prescriptions. On March 16th, I woke up early because I knew that more serious restrictions due to the coronavirus were likely about to come into effect soon and I wanted to make certain that I had enough of my medications to hopefully weather a lengthy stay indoors so I was going to my local doctor’s office. I have preexisting conditions that may put me at higher risk for a severe COVID-19 infection. Those same preexisting conditions also put me at risk of potentially being denied life saving care in the event that I need a respirator.

I as a mad, physically disabled, autistic person may not meet the standards of the often terrifying triage that is taking place in areas where hospitals are struggling to meet the needs of too many patients with too few resources.

Better if I just don’t leave my apartment, my doctor agrees.

March 16th it turns out was the day everything was going to start shutting down, including the medical clinic I had just arrived at. The staff had apparently received word overnight that they should no longer see patients on site and start figuring out how to set up appointments over video chat.

As I and about a dozen other people waited outside the unexpectedly closed clinic for word from the staff inside, we tried to keep 6 feet apart. Ultimately, the doctors decked out in plastic scrubs, gloves, and face masks decided to see patients while only allowing us into the clinic two at a time.

My doctor renewed my two regular anti-anxiety medications and also wrote me a third prescription for Lorazepam to be taken as needed just in case. While I did not question the additional prescription I rather cockily assumed that I would be fine with my regular regiment of meds. I’d been doing very well up to that point hadn’t I?

It only took a few hours for some very severe anxiety to kick in as I realized that maintaining access to food was going to be difficult. The demand on delivery services which prior to the outbreak had never been a problem was suddenly very difficult. This in turn created a lot of financial anxiety as I realized that if I was going to get enough to eat during quarantine, I would be spending more on service fees as what orders I could get through showed up with less than half my requested items. Since then even getting a delivery slot has often been impossible. I may end up having to rely on takeout delivery which is much more accessible but also far more expensive.

I have been grateful for my doctor’s consideration that I might be put under even more stress and her efforts to lesson that burden repeatedly.

At the start of all this none of the emergency assistance measures had been put in place so the financial concerns were particularly stressful. Since the implementation of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) and other form of financial assistance, some of those concerns have been alleviated but because the criteria for eligibility is ever changing and because all applications are being approved, the stress has just been put off for a later date. I now have to worry about having this money clawed back next tax season when I will most definitely no longer have it. I’m pretty sure I qualify but there is always that doubt lingering in the back of my mind.

Aside from the stress caused by figuring out how to survive in a changed world, I have also found myself succumbing to some of the symptoms of the shared trauma of this pandemic. For the first couple of weeks I tried to remain active and productive. I exercised as much as possible in the confines of my apartment, I tried to diligently work on my comprehensive exams. I ultimately succumbed to terrible emotional exhaustion which was made worse by the almost nightly vivid nightmares.

I have more recently slowed down significantly. I spend much of my time reading novels while only getting minimal work done. While I am not making great gains on my comprehensive exams, my stress level is much lower and I am sleeping better.

Please give yourselves permission to just give up expectations, it’s the best advice I can give you in this situation.

One of the things that I and several of my disabled friends have noticed during this time is that with the while world isolating, it brings the extent of our own isolation in general into sharp focus. It’s not normal to be a recluse when everyone is doing it.

To make matter worse, I haven’t been able to stay as reclusive as I’d like to. Two weeks ago, my estranged mother with whom I have not spoken for nearly two years decided to use the pandemic and my mental health history to try and force contact. She did this by calling York Campus Security on me. I have no idea what she told them. All I know is that one minute I was contentedly watching YouTube videos and the next I was answering the door of my apartment to two security guards because “a family member (my mother) had called and expressed concern for me”.

They seemed quite surprised that I was up and dressed and was not displaying any characteristics of either illness or distress. They even asked me to show them my student card so they could verify that they were speaking to the right person. While they were apologetic, it did not stop them from informing the university that I had been subjected to a wellness check. Based on the email I got from them it is clear that they did not explain that the check had been unnecessary. I also told them that I was not in contact with my family and had not been since well before the current global crisis started. I have no faith however that a security service that would subject someone to medical overreach my the university would have had the decency not to call my mother back after her interference and “concern” proved to be unfounded.

It is important to remember that abuse is actually more common now even for those of us who have put over 1000 miles between ourselves and our abusers.

That episode took me days to recover from and the university has no interest in recognizing that they have acted as a proxy for an abuser twice now.

In the midst of all this stress and coping, the one new thing that I have been working on is finally figuring out how to do my own makeup. Here is a picture of me trying to be goth

View this post on Instagram

#wednesdayaddams with better white balance

A post shared by Kim Sauder (@kimberleysauder) on

Image Desrcription: A pale woman with dark lipstick stands against a woodgrain wall. The shot is from below giving the impression that she might be lying down. She is wearing a dress reminiscent of Wednesday Addams

You can see some of my other attempts on my Instagram but be forewarned, I am not good at selfies or Instagram.

This pandemic has been hard on all of us but it has been an additional burden on disabled people as the response has not meaningfully considered our needs. People receiving disability benefits are largely not receiving further aid despite CERB being higher than disability payments. We are also a population that already relied on grocery delivery and nothing has been put in place to ensure that we maintain access to those services. Many of us do not have the option to even choose to risk our health and pop to the store. Shopping was already inaccessible to us.

This is such a stressful time and I am making my way through it, the best that I can. I hope that better policies are coming for disabled people but I’m also not holding my breath.

How to Support Me and My Work

The outbreak of COVID-19 has created a lot of financial precarity for me, so I would really appreciate any assistance you are able to offer

Please if you are able help the most vulnerable in your communities by practicing social distancing responsibly and by not hoarding resources.

I personally am experiencing financial difficulties as a result of Covid-19 and would appreciate any assistance you can offer, even if it’s just to share this blog post.

If you are able please consider helping me financially during this time. My situation is quite precarious.

You can support me on Patreon

Become a Patron!

You can buy me a coffee

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Or send me money directly through Paypal

paypal.me/crippledscholar

March has Been a Bad Month for Disabled People

Image Description: Me, a pale blonde woman wearing a plaid dress and cream coloured sweater standing at a podium, reading names off of a list for the Disability Day of Mourning
Image Description: Me, a pale blonde woman wearing a plaid dress and cream coloured sweater standing at a podium, reading names off of a list for the Disability Day of Mourning

On Sunday March 1, I attended the Disability Day of Mourning Service which commemorates the disabled people who have been murdered by parents or caregivers. Attending this year has taken on further meaning as the world grapples with the pandemic of the novel corona virus. Much of the world is in turmoil right now and far to often disabled people are bearing the brunt of negative experiences and expectations.

The virus has gotten so bad that the entire country of Italy is in lock down. The number of people experiencing severe symptoms exceeds the Italian healthcare system’s capacity to effectively treat them all. The country has had to start implementing catastrophe triage. Essentially choosing who will have a chance to live and who will almost certainly die.

Those most at risk of death or serious symptoms are unsurprisingly disabled people, people with compromised immune systems, and the elderly. We are facing a period of human history where many people may die and that the most like casualties will be marginalized people. Catastrophe triage will not act kindly for us. If it comes to that.

Illness is not however, the only serious risk to disabled people at this time. With the instruction to move indoors and to practice social distancing. Many otherwise healthy and able people are turning to delivery services to obtain essentials, while others are participating in panic buying which limits availability of necessary items.

Disabled people often rely on delivery services and our access to them is being seriously curtailed. I am at risk for serious food insecurity for the first time in my life and it is because predominantly healthy and able people are dominating services that I and other disabled people rely on.

I managed to get a delivery window for this evening. It has already been postponed to even later. I don’t know what portion if any of my order will actually show up at my door.

During a time that is already very tense for disabled people, we have also been informed that the man responsible for the Sagamihara Massacre has been sentenced to death.

I am at a loss about how to feel about this. I oppose the death penalty personally. I am trying to decide if I can be glad that his actions were so severely condemned while being uncomfortable with the actual punishment he received.

I can only be hoped that his victims (most of whom have still not been named publicly) and their families can find some peace.

This month started off with the Disability day of Mourning which was a sharp reminder of the extreme loss we experience in the disabled community at the hands of people who are supposed to comfort and care for us. Each day of remembrance includes the reading of the names of the dead. This is an endeavor that can take nearly an hour or more.

I started this month remembering those that we have lost already only to suddenly find myself in a world where disabled and vulnerable people are out at higher risk and that our overall survival may be based on the harsh realities of catastrophe medicine. Now we are also forced to relive the horror of the 19 murders that took place in the Tsukui Yamayuri En (Tsukui Lily Garden) facility.

This has been a hard month and it isn’t even over yet.

Please if you are able help the most vulnerable in your communities by practicing social distancing responsibly and by not hoarding resources.

I personally am experiencing financial difficulties as a result of Covid-19 and would appreciate any assistance you can offer, even if it’s just to share this blog post.

If you are able please consider helping me financially during this time. My situation is quite precarious.

You can support me on Patreon

Become a Patron!

You can buy me a coffee

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Or send me money directly through Paypal

paypal.me/crippledscholar

Trying to Maintain Access to Essentials During Covid-19 While Disabled

image description: A very crowded grocery store with many people waiting at the checkout like

The world it seems has dissended into chaos as a result of the novel coronavirus. The real problem here is that it leaves vulnerable people at risk of not being able to quire groceries. I am personally am facing imminent food insecurity as the ways I am able to obtain food come into higher demand.

I rely on grocery delivery services to get food. Not only are these workers working through the added barrier of far too many people being in the stores at one which make their jobs harder but they are also being inundated with more orders than usual as people choose to remain home rather than shop for themselves.

This leaves disabled people like me in the position of being left the scraps. I have no way of knowing if the groceries I ordered yesterday will be available when someone is finally going to be able to shop for them tomorrow evening. I’m not optimist. This means I will likely have to make multiple orders over several days. This adds additional costs that I can already ill afford.

I was relying on receiving student loans over the summer but with cancellation and universities closing, I might not be able to access that option.

The problem of overcrowding and panic buying at the grocery store presents issues beyond placing vulnerable people into food insecurity. It will also help spread the virus. Toronto (where I am) and other places have started to experience community spread of the disease. It is so important to be able to practice social distancing right now. Crowding grocery stores at this time puts everyone at much higher risk.

We desperately need the trend of panic buying to end not only so other people can access necessary supplies but to also make the act of shopping safer. It will be a total nightmare if there is a covid-19 outbreak at a grocery store.

Please plan for and act responsibly during this time. One of the biggest things you can do is to STOP PANIC BUYING! You are creating vulnerabilities in the community by doing so. You are also ensuring that grocery store are packed to the gills which seriously increases the risk of transmission.

Only go to the store if you need something, and if you are able do that shopping yourself. Disabled people and other people at high risk, rely on delivery services, so please do not monopolize them.

If your in the financial position to do so please consider those of us who are placed in financial trouble by this pandemic.

Remember, getting through this is going to be a community effort.

If you are able please consider helping me financially during this time. My situation is quite precarious.

You can support me on Patreon

You can buy me a coffee

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Or send me money directly through Paypal

paypal.me/crippledscholar

So You Can’t Take Your Reusable Mug To Starbucks Anymore but Why is No One Talking About The Environment Though?

Image Description: A Starbucks disposable cup with a blurry cafe in the background

Starbucks, The Second Cup and Tim Hortons are temporarily discontinuing their practice of allowing customers to bring in their own reusable mugs because the practice is seen as a potential way to spread the corona virus. I have no particular issue with this change in policy but the conversation around it or more accurately the conversation that is not happening is more interesting.

This change is being presented without reference to the reason these stores promoted the option to bring reusable cups in the first place. Reusable mugs are encouraged encouraged because of the desire to cut down on the waste produced by disposable cups.

This is important to consider because it really demonstrates who is valued in the world and whose needs it is necessary to consider while creating policies that have a social impact. For years environmental activists have been waging a war against single use plastics and individually created waste. There was a lot of focus placed on individuals to make personal decisions that reduced their individual waste.

In some cases, particularly regarding single use plastics like straws, people who benefit from them were actively demonized, spoken over, or ignored. This is despite the fact that items like plastic straws are necessary for many disabled people to enable their ability to drink (and no reusable options are not good substitutes, I have already fought you, go away). Items like prepacked precut fruits and vegetables give access and improve the quality of life of many disabled people with dexterity issues (myself included).

When disabled people objected to the demonization and efforts (some successful) to ban these items, we were treated as disposable, as acceptable collateral to the fight for the environment. Yet, here we are in a situation where another environmental endeavour potentially raises the risk to the primarily nondisabled population and suddenly the environmental aspect of why that policy existed in the first place disappears. There is no outcry that the risk of viral spread is an acceptable risk in the fight to save the environment.

Again, I am entirely fine with this change in policy. It is the appropriate response to lower the risk of viral spread. It is however telling that the same consideration is not given when the population at risk of harm is disabled people.

And to be clear rhetoric around the spread and risk of the corona virus is already seriously devaluing disabled people. The risk of a fatal infection of the virus is highest in people who have compromised immune systems. So the risk is greatest for disabled people and the elderly.

Many people are already minimizing the threat of the virus simply because they are not the people at greatest risk. They are treating those that are as inconsequential. This indicates just how othered disabled people are. We are not the people who will be mourned if we are casualties to this virus.

That is why it is so important that the change in policy in major coffee franchises hasn’t included the environmental angle in discussion. It shows very clearly whose needs must be considered when making concessions in discussions of “the greater good” and whose needs can be ignored regardless of the consequences.

How to Support My Work

So now for the very in-depth appeal for support for my PhD. Please read through this, there are so many ways to help, including just sharing this blog post on social media.

If you want to help me buy books and other resources for my PhD, you can buy me an amazon gift card and send it to the following email address

The email is kimberleyjanephd@gmail.com

I will not be answering queries about my research through this email. It is solely a way for people who want to support my work to be able to do so. (this is a safety boundary). If you want to talk to me, find me on Twitter.

My research and supporting myself will get past the reading phase and there will be field work in my future. If you would like to help me fund my PhD in the long term you can

support me on patreon

Become a Patron!

buy me a ko-fi

send me money via paypal

send an e money transfer to the email above (if you have scruples about third party sites) use the answer “scholar” for etransfers

I Stand With Wet’suwet’en: Don’t Use Disabled People to Shame Protesters

Disabled people can be a very convenient scapegoat to either be the victim or the villain in just about any social issue. When it comes the environmental causes we have certainly been both.

In the often misguided war on single use plastic we are both the villains for needing many single use plastic products. We are also largely ignored as bans on things like plastic straws gain momentum. The latest battle is one where we are being used as convenient victims to shame the growing national protests in support of the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs against the encroachment of a nationalized pipeline going through an unapproved route through their territory.

This issue is also so much bigger than the environment as it is also primarily an issue of Canadian colonialism and racism against Indigenous people. Yet, a British Columbia disability org, Disability Alliance BC wants to reframe an issue about land sovereignty and reconciliation as an issue of accessibility. This is a viewpoint that at least one news outlet seems happy to parrot.

It places the presumed access needs of disabled Canadians over the rights of Canadians to protest and over the rights of Indigenous Canadians.

I am appalled by the colonialism being practiced in my name and I want to express in the strongest terms that Disability Alliance BC does not speak for me.

I condemn completely the very idea a weaponizing disabled people in service to colonialism and placing our comfort and convenience against the rights of Indigenous people. Because, let’s be clear this isn’t an argument about conflicting rights. This is largely an argument against inconvenience. The same kind of inconvenience that everyone is intended to experience as a result of these kinds of protests.

Disability Alliance BC could be spending its time trying to mitigate the inconvenience to disabled people who lives might be disrupted by the current wave of protests. They have by no means shut down all travel in the country. They have instead chosen to shame protesters who want to support reconciliation and the Wet’suwet’en protests, rather than look for available solutions and place the blame where it really belongs. On the doorstep of a colonial government that both seeks to further entrench Canada in colonial violence and which on an every day basis fails to invest in accessibility for disabled Canadians. If Canada cared about accessibility disabled people wouldn’t be able to be used as a stick with which to bludgeon protesters because we would already have options to deal with unexpected travel delays.

If disability and access must come up in this conversation let it be one of criticism of how we still don’t have those options and how that is a structural wrong that should not be placed at the feet of protesters. Let the conversation also highlight the additional barriers Indigenous disabled people face as a result of colonialism.

Do not, however, legitimize the idea that protesters are wronging disabled people. Society already did that. I know I am not the only disabled person who does not want to be used as a tool to deny justice to others. My humanity should not and demonstrably in this case does not come at the cost of the humanity and rights of others.

I stand with Wet’suwet’en

I condemn the rhetoric of division that puts my rights and comfort above the rights of others. Particularly when their rights are being actively attacked by the government. When they face direct intimidation and violence from the RCMP.

I stand with Wet’sewet’en not with Disability Alliance BC

On Deserving to Have your PhD Funded

Image Description: A Photo of my Masters of Art Certificate
Image Description: A Photo of my Masters of Art Certificate

There is a lot of advice about getting advanced degrees, particularly PhDs one of the big ones being

Don’t do it unless you don’t have to pay for it.

PhDs are expensive and time consuming. When I was accepted to my PhD, I was offered a funding package. It barely covers my rent, much less my tuition. My funding is also contingent on whether I am working or not. My health over the last year has been in shambles for a variety of reasons and my ability to work has been compromised. Oh, I’m accommodated but I receive my money in 3 separate payments. The 4 hours a week they pay me to work. Then a smaller amount to that used to be paid in the paycheck but isn’t anymore for some reason. Finally I get another few hundred dollars the following month in recognition of both my funding and the fact that my accommodations state that I am well enough to work 10 hours a week (which is the standard ideal average set by the university. I just need my tasks to be accessible. I never asked for less work.

This 3 payment system makes it difficult to impossible to survive on a budget that already also includes a student loan.

If I wasn’t a PhD student, I would be homeless or a “burden on the state” those are just realities that I have to live with. Being a PhD student keeps me fed.

My research is also going to require field work which will cost money. I will have to return to my hometown and acquire all of my old school and medical records.

I also have to consider whether I have access to research materials in an accessible format. The more books I can own in kindle format, the more organized my research will be. I am of course investing my own money in this endeavour but I am going to come up short.

I have decided to start asking the readers of my blog to consider supporting my PhD work in a number of ways. This decision has lead to a lot of backlash though largely not by the regular readers of my blog.

I am receiving criticism mainly from trolls on twitter but I am also getting shamed on reddit and it all comes down to this idea that if I ask for money that I must be some kind of entitled fraud.

For the record, I’ve thus far been given a whopping $90 which I spent on ebooks. The idea that the simple act of asking for help constitutes entitlement is interesting. If only Jordan Peterson’s fans were of the same opinion about him while he was making thousands a month on the site (until he was kicked off).

I currently make a whopping $45/month on patreon. There seems to be this false idea that the mere act of asking for money or other help immediately results in success is also frequently present.

So do I “deserve” to have my PhD crowdfunded? That’s up to other people to decide. I do know that my research has value and has already peaked the interest of a number of fellow academics (don’t worry fam, I know we’re all poor).

My blog stats are exploding today, mostly as a result of people enraged with the idea that I might be overly entitled for asking for things that I have no control over whether I receive them.

There is also just the issue of what online content counts as the kind that people can “legitimately” turn into businesses. My blog content is often activist in tone and many seem to think that politically active marginalized people can survive on nothing but air because they get very angry when we remind people we need to eat and pay rent. The idea that my activism isn’t work is always ironic particularly in September when my blog stats let me know just how many universities have courses that use my work.

This has never been about whether I deserve to have my PhD funded and everything to do with who is allowed to personally place value on their own work. I am not forcing people to give me money. There is no pay wall on this website.

Do I deserve to get paid for the work I do, yes. Are you personally required to put up the money, no.

Thank you for coming to my rant on work, ability, and worth

How to Support My Work

So now for the very in-depth appeal for support for mu PhD. Please read through this, there are so many ways to help, including just sharing this blog post on social media.

Kindle ebooks read on my iPad are the easiest way for me to read and take notes unfortunately Amazon does not allow people to buy ebooks for others through their wishlist system. I have an Amazon Wish list anyway as some of the books can only be purchased in print or from third party sellers because they are out of print. If you could buy me one of the books that can only be had in print, I would greatly appreciate it. If you want to help fund the ebooks I’ll need you can buy me a gift card and send it to the following email address

The email is kimberleyjanephd@gmail.com

I will not be answering queries about my research through this email. It is solely a way for people who want to support my work to be able to do so. (this is a safety boundary). If you want to talk to me, find me on Twitter.

My research and supporting myself will get past the reading phase and there will be field work in my future. If you would like to help me fund my PhD in the long term you can

support me on patreon

Become a Patron!

buy me a ko-fi

send me money via paypal

send an e money transfer to the email above (if you have scruples about third party sites)

I also have a generic disability wish list of things that would just improve my quality of life

Thank you for your ongoing support. and just an FYI I’m changing my name socially to Kimberley Jane Erin. You can call me Kim or Jane but I prefer Jane. I am however, not the least uncomfortable with Kim so don’t worry about messing up.

It’s time I really leaned into my identity as a scholar. I hope you’ll support me